"Historical Memory and Imagined Communities: Modern Ibadi Writings on Kharijism"
Valerie J. Hoffman
Department of Religion University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois, U.S.A.


Ibadis are nearly universally defined as “moderate Khawarij” or the only surviving sect of Kharijism, but contemporary Ibadis deny that they are Khawarij at all, although they do not deny their sympathy with
certain Kha- rijite perspectives or that their sect emerged from the same pivotal historical events that produced the Khawarij. This paper looks at a number of Ibadi writings on Kharijism from the early 19th to
the early 21st century and finds that while it was not controversial to identify the Ibadis as a Kharijite group in the early 19th century, the movement toward pan-Islamic identity and rapprochement with Sunni Islam that began in the late 19th century led Iba- dis to adamantly reject identification with the Khawarij, although they con- tinued to admire and identify with the people of al-Nahrawan.

Scientific Committee

  • Abdulrahman Al Salmi, Sultanate of Oman
  • Adam Gaiser, Florida University
  • Angeliki Ziaka, Aristotle University
  • Ersilia Francesca, University Orientale
  • Valerie Hoffman, Illinois Urbana-Champaign University
  • Yohei Kondo,Tokyo University